Episode 81: Censorship @ lemood
November 18, 2013

Tune-in to hear our first ever remote broadcast from November 4th, 2013 when we broadcast live with Malcah in-studio at CFRC and Avi joining in from Montreal. We were also joined by Sarah Woolf, a writer and researcher who was recently uninvited from participating in the Le Mood “festival of unexpected Jewish learning, arts and culture.” Woolf was scheduled to moderate two panels – one about a historical walking tour of Montreal’s garment industry and another titled “Where are all the radical Jews?” about the radical history of Montreal Jews and Jewish institutions, until she the panels were cancelled, effectively banning Sarah along with co-panelists Aaron Lakoff, Moishe-Volf Dolman, and Lisa Vinebaum from participating in Le Mood. We spoke to Sarah about the censorship and what she and the other scheduled panel participants did afterwards. Sarah also shared content from the upcoming walking tour about labour organizing and the Montreal garment industry.

The show also features previewed tracks from the new album of Geoff Berner covers, Festival Man, which accompanies his new book by the same title (“Unlistenable Song” covered by Rae Spoon & “The Rich Will Move to the High Ground” covered by Kris Demeanor and Cutest Kitten Ever!). Finally, we rebroadcast an excerpt from our interview last year with Jonah Aline Daniel from Narrow Bridge Candles.

Click here to listen to the show.

Click here for more information about the Le Mood censorship.

Learn about the Interactive Museum of Jewish Montreal here.

BORGSHIP_FEDERATIONCJABUILDING

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Episode 33: “Where I Stay” An interview with Josh Healey
February 1, 2010

Josh Healey is a writer, poet, and community organizer based in Oakland, California. Speaking to radio613 about coming up in the East, activism in the Bay, being dis-invited from the JStreet conference in October 2009, and more – with knowledge of self, strong words to incite, and a callout for solidarity. Live poetry reading of the pieces “Born in 1984”, “Queer Intifada”, and “Where I Stay.”

Music from Invincible (“Spacious Skies”), Zion I ft. Brother Ali (“Caged Bird”), and Lauryn Hill (“Lost Ones”).

Tune in!!!!! Click here to listen (right-click to donwload).

More info:
Huffington Post article “Searching for a Minyan: Our Response to Being Censored by JStreet”
Josh Healey presents HAMMERTIME
Kevin Coval.com

Episode 26: Memories of a “Jewish Market”
October 30, 2009

After enduring a campaign of stonewalling and slander from mainstream Jewish institutions, artist Reena Katz and curator Kim Simon’s exhibit ‘each hand as they are called’ returned to the streets of Toronto this October. radio613 caught up with Katz for the exhibit’s finale. Tune in for the results of a public site work that evokes a complex and dynamic representation of Toronto’s diverse personal, political, and cultural Yiddish and Jewish histories. Included in the broadcast – Katz’s haunting musical compositions performed throughout Kensington Market. Inspired by the exhibit, Malcah recounts the landscape of Toronto’s Jewish feminist labour movement in the 1920s and 1930s.

This week’s show concludes with a new (comic) book review segment and tries to answer what it means to be a Jew…ish cat: a reading and review of Johann Sfar’s brilliant work The Rabbi’s Cat. Music from The Barry Sisters and Adrienne Cooper.

Click here to listen (right-click to download).

eachhand.org
RadioDress Productions

Episode 21: Blocklisting Jewish Art
May 21, 2009

Over the last year, Toronto sound, installation, and performance artist Reena Katz has developed an inspiring exhibit exploring Jewish history in Kensington market. The exhibit – each hand as they are called – was set to launch at the Luminato Festival on May 20, 2009. A last minute decision by the Koffler Centre For the Arts to completely dissociate from Katz, based on their perception of Katz’s Israel/Palestine politics, is currently preventing the exhibit from taking place.

radio613 spoke with Katz this week to talk about each hand as they are called, the process of blocklisting, and the efforts of hegemonic institutions to confine exchange of ideas and expression.

Click here to listen to the interview (right-click to download).